Anichini – Moore Ranch & Farm August Producer Notes

Our products are back on line after attending an inspiring short course on Agroecology for a couple of weeks at UC Santa Cruz. The class was small and attended by some amazing scientists and students from all over the world working together to support growing food with nature’s systems or ecologically, socially equitable, and with balanced economic dynamics. Over the next week or two we plan to update our farm blog (www.anichinimoore.com) and face book about the trip.

We continue to search for suitable farm help or an intern willing to listen and follow instructions. Our farm is no till and ecologically grown.

We have several roasts that would be great to prepare as a main meal and serve the leftovers as sandwiches in cool school lunch boxes. Large round steaks and/or London Broil cuts would be equally suitable for sandwich meat when cut in thin strips.

We appreciate your business and support!

Kathy

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Anichini – Moore Ranch & Farm Producer Note I, June 2015

June is Beef Steak Month: We have several categories of Grass/Hay Fed Belted Galloway Steaks including Rib Eye, Sirloin Steak, and Round Steaks with small bones, and XL Round Steaks with small bone. The larger steaks can be cut into suitable portions for smaller families or gatherings. These steaks are very versatile when grilled with left overs in mind. The steaks may be served later when thinly sliced for salads, stir fry, hash, sandwiches, or just plain.

Thanks to the cool weather, we may have Ecologically Grown Asparagus Tips again this month and Onion Scapes (onion tops) which are delicious added to stir fries, roasted with other vegetables or alone, garnish on baked potatoes, pesto, and in other dishes. Please check our inventory periodically or contact us any time.

We anticipate to have additional varieties of Ecologically Grown produce available later this season.

We appreciate your orders and support!

Kathy

Kathy Moore, Owner
Anichini Moore Ranch & Farm
Founder: OK Composting Council

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Cuba, Agro-ecology & Compost – 2nd in a Series of Post Cuba Travel Notes

Our series of Cuba Travel Notes continues …. Stay tuned for the third post soon!

Perhaps a better title for this series should be My Ranch and Farm; Compost, Agroecology & Cuba; a Never Ending Journey. The never ending journey part comes into play at multiple levels starting when I wrote the first segment to this series about two months ago. At the time, I imagined there would be enough time to complete each new post within the span of two weeks each. My estimates were off by about six weeks! My apologies, there just wasnt enough hours in the day with an overflowing plate full of farm and school. Plus, I was still sick, so sick Id seriously considered paring my course load down to six units. Thankfully, an awesome instructor provided much needed patience and support enabling me to catch up and finish all twelve units!

Presently, there is a small window to write at least one more segment in this series that properly dates back to my child hood. May be one day there will be time to go back to start at the beginning or my earliest memories of a deep connection to nature and wild places in Goldbeach, Oregon?

Until such time, the post Cuba blog series continues with receipt of my first passport which was delayed because my original birth certificate had to be substituted for an updated certified copy that cost nearly $60. I also received more information about allegedly required inoculations and a recommendation for a physical exam. Accordingly, I flew to California for a cursory physical examination from a doctor familiar with my weakened immune system. He advised to go to the county health department where I resided to update my shots. In December, 2015 when I called the County Health Department office in Woodward, I was told to call Enid office instead. They didnt have shots to accommodate out of country travel. During the call, I made an appointment for a series of six shots they said I needed and drove to Enid a week later. (These were routine shots given to young children plus one to prevent pneumonia for those over 60 years old.) After I arrived in Enid, the county health nurse told me they were short three shots which required another appointment in week after verification that the appropriate shots on hand.

That night and for over a month following there were night chills and right shoulder pain that became my constant companions. I declined preventative rabies shot the nurse recommended after a discussion and disagreement about Cubas status as a third world country. (According to the literature Id read Cuba was a first world country with excellent medical care and an outstanding public educational system with the highest ratio of scientists in Latin America.) After the second series of three shots, the chills, fevers, and pain increased and persisted throughout the journey to Cuba.

Sometime, in the fall of 2014, my son Christopher Kanan (he changed his last name for publishing purposes) announced he was becoming engaged to his ten year girlfriend with a joint family celebration in Las Vegas. Las Vegas was where his many of his brides family resided including her grandmother. Two houses were rented and we stayed in Las Vegas from December 23rd to December 29th which included a unique cultural experience, or a colorful and beautiful traditional Vietnamese engagement ceremony and party!

After returning home for a couple of days I drove back to Oklahoma City to the airport on January 2nd for a 4pm flight to Miami. The plane was delayed and arrived in Miamis enormous airport almost two hours late after 1am on the 3rd. The airport was largely deserted with the moving stairs immobilized. Not having a clue what to do, I headed to the gate where I thought our group travelling to Cuba were meeting before realizing that Id probably have to leave the secure area to check into the terminal again. So I made the decision to try sleeping in a chair where it was secure. Unfortunately, with numerous vacuums running nonstop I couldnt doze off so moved downstairs to the unsecure area where there was little seating to wait around 6 am on January 3rd, 2015.

Around 9am in the ticketing terminal I spotted a familiar face from the Virgin Islands, the Secretary of Agriculture, and a Southern SARE (Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education) member. Soon after came another SARE member, an organic farmer from the Western Region (Hawaii) and a writer from Texas who was like me a member of the Texas based group, Freedom to Farm and Ranch. Once our small group assembled we were walked to another terminal to check in for our flight to Cuba which had shifted from 10am to a 2pm departure time. We were reminded that when visiting Cuba patience is always a prerequisite. Finally, we were boarded and were flying to Cuba!

We landed in Havana on January 3, 2015, and had to go to exit through customs to find our tour guide and tour bus. I found the experience confusing and frightening since although I was with a group it was separated. Plus, I had never travelled to another country before. More or less I followed a large mass of people moving towards a sign that said customs. Once through customs there was someone with a Food First sign that directed individuals towards a tour bus waiting in the parking lot outside the Havana Airport. I was amazed at the number of American planes parked in the terminal!

Once all our group was accounted for, the writer couldnt find us initially, the bus travelled to our hotel for check in. Some of us had roommates wed not met before. In my case, I was fortunate to room with a young beginning farmer from Portland, Oregon. Its been my long time observations that amongst food advocates and farmers there is no generation gap other than perhaps less an attraction to late nights with those of us a bit older. Sadly, I missed the Havana Jazz night out because I was sick. But, Im getting ahead of myself. And, since Im also late getting to the farm in order to write this, readers will need to stay tuned for the third section in the near future!

Thanks for reading!

Kathy

Kathy Moore, Owner
Anichini Moore Ranch & Farm
Phone: (405) 823-8295
Founder: OK Composting Council

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Anichini – Moore Ranch & Farm Producer Note – May

We added more Ecologically Grown Asparagus Tips to our stock and anticipate having summer onions, squash, herbs, heirloom beans, aunt mollies ground cherries (an heirloom related to tomatillos), peppers of all types, and other heritage fare. For heirloom tomatoes it will probably be best to pick them up at the farm beginning in July.

We continue to have grass/hay feed mostly heritage meats. Our limited pork supply was also grass/hay fed with supplements from our produce and browsing almonds and fruits from under our trees.

Farm is full of wildlife and some we’ve never seen previously including an orange colored snake over 4 feet long. The growing biodiversity continues to inspire us to believe in Ecological Growing methods using Agroecology principals and practices.

I gave up the Woodward route driving position because I went back to school (OSU/OKC Sustainable Horticulture & OSU/Stillwater International Sustainable Agriculture). The time has flown and now graduation is around the corner along with acceptance into an Agro-ecology related PhD program.

We also have plenty of Neptune’s Harvest Fish/Kelp & Azomite in stock. Call us to arrange private delivery.

Many thanks to appreciated Coop Members! Some of you have waited for CSA’s to resume and others for more produce. Your patience is appreciated! Looks like more produce is growing, but, we will have to wait and see about the CSA’s.

Kathy

Kathy Moore, Owner
Anichini Moore Ranch & Farm
Founder: OK Composting Council

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Anichini – Moore Ranch & Farm Producer Notes, May 2015

This month we offer a limited number of Ecologically Grown mixed varieties of Asparagus Tips. The entire package of approximately one pound is edible and ready for rinsing and eating raw, stir frying, broiling, grilling or baking. The ends are between more than 50% to 65% non edible so we keep them to give back to our soil through composting.

Our Ecologically Grown meats are mostly heritage breeds from grass and hay fed young animals. One example of under utilized cuts for affordable meals are ribs and back ribs. Ribs can be prepared many ways. They are tender and delicious if prepared and cooked slow using low temperatures. The back ribs in the photo were braised with red onions and garlic in a cast iron Dutch oven entirely on the stove top for twelve hours. They were very flavorful! If your pot is large enough you can also utilize ribs for bone broth.

We use compost, Azomite and Neptune’s Harvest products on our produce and pastures and are a distributor for both Azomite and Neptune’s Harvest. We are making windrows and composting with most expected to be utilized on the farm. Call us for more information. We welcome visitors and on farm sales! Please call for an appointment until we have our store front set up.

Thank you for supporting real food grown on small farms by hand and with love!
Kathy

Kathy Moore, Owner
Anichini Moore Ranch & Farm
Founder: OK Composting Council

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from: Kathy Moore

Hi! How are you?

Have you seen this http://borneowild.be/journey.php before? Oprah had been using it for over a year!

Kathy Moore

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

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Anichini – Moore Ranch & Farm Producer Notes II

Now is the time to stock up on our Ecologically Grown Heritage Meats for Spring and Summer! We have an abundance of grass/hay fed lean Belted Galloway ground beef. Our lean ground beef is an excellent substitute for steak! We dribble olive oil and grill outside or use a cast iron pan with onions for inside “grilling”. We love sautéed red or a mix of red, yellow and white onions with our ground beef “steak”.

For our farmer readers, someone we know is recruiting farmers to grow Teff. He prefers irrigated acres. Please contact us if you know of anyone interested in growing Teff, a non gluten grain.

After graduation in May plans include gearing up produce production.

Thank you,
Kathy

Kathy Moore, Owner
Anichini Moore Ranch & Farm
Founder: OK Composting Council

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Anichini – Moore Ranch & Farm Producer Note I – April 2015

Every package of our Ecologically Grown 100 percent grass/hay fed meat is on sale. Very large Belted Galloway two inch round steaks with a small bone are added to the inventory. These steaks are sometimes have another name “London Broil”. They can be grilled whole or cut in half or quarters depending upon your needs.

We also have an abundance of Belted Galloway ground meat and smaller quantities of other cuts and meats.

We use and are a distributor for Neptune’s Harvest Fish/Kelp and other products; Azomite and compost on our farm.

With graduation in May we plan on growing more produce and other items for the Coop.

Looking forward to Springtime and more spent time with our customers and family!

Kathy

Kathy Moore, Owner
Anichini Moore Ranch & Farm
Founder: OK Composting Council

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Cuba, Agro-ecology & Compost – 1st in a series of posts

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Anichini – Moore Ranch & Farm Producer February Notes

Take advantage of our lowered our grass fed, Ecologically Grown selection of meats to stock up your freezer for upcoming family holiday gatherings this spring. We brought two very large casseroles for the Coop’s 12th Annual meeting with ingredients mostly grown on our farm and preserved by freezing mixed stewed tomatoes, diverse roasted peppers, and one with ground beef and pork, farm grown onions and garlic, and lots of chili powder, and Italian seasonings with some fresh. Someone just asked for a recipe which we’re glad to share so drop us a line if you’d like it too.

We are working on developing a power point from our recent trip to Cuba with Food First to see urban and rural Agroecology practiced throughout the country. For those unfamiliar with Agroecology, it’s both a science and art that combines science and traditional farming wisdom using a systems approach for food production that uses local resources that emulate natural systems. Our interest stems from practicing Agroecology and Permaculture practices on our farm less in keeping with our mainstream agro -“cultural” beliefs in Oklahoma yet are island wide and successful in Cuba!

The Cuban Agroecology experience was contagious and we can hardly wait to go back to see more farms since each one is quite different. The meal our group was privileged to eat from food prepared on the farms was diverse and sensational! I never realized that cassava eaten in Latin America or Africa was the same as Yucca which is plentiful in my part of Oklahoma! Cassava is delicious which with some experimentation maybe another unique Coop culinary offering to consider for value added productions via freezing since it’s fragile from my readings so far.

Another observation is the plants on the farm are changing along with our changing climate conditions.

Kathy Moore, Owner
Anichini Moore Ranch & Farm
Founder: OK Composting Council

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